NixWO2.72 nanorods (NRs) are synthesized by a one-pot reaction of Ni(acac)2 and WCl4. In the rod structure, Ni(II) intercalates in the defective perovskite-type WO2.72 and is stabilized. The NixWO2.72 NRs show the x-dependent electrocatalysis for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in 0.1M KOH with Ni0.78WO2.72 being the most efficient, even outper...
Born Linghu Jihua, Ling was the third son to Linghu Ye (令狐野), a party official, in Pinglu County, Shanxi Province. He and all four of his siblings received names related to the Communist Party's policies. His own name, Jihua, means "planning". In December 1973, as with many other young Chinese, he was sent to work in the countryside as part of the Down to the Countryside Movement. Ling worked in a printing factory.[4] "Linghu" is a very rare surname, eventually most members of the Ling family shortened the "Linghu" to "Ling".

Tailoring terminated edge of hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) for enhancing catalysis has turned to be an imperative for the rational design of a highly active aerobic catalyst. Herein, a tailoring N-terminated porous BN (P-BN) strategy is reported with a zinc (Zn) salt as a dual-functional template. The Zn salt acts as both an in situ template and a...
NixWO2.72 nanorods (NRs) are synthesized by a one-pot reaction of Ni(acac)2 and WCl4. In the rod structure, Ni(II) intercalates in the defective perovskite-type WO2.72 and is stabilized. The NixWO2.72 NRs show the x-dependent electrocatalysis for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in 0.1M KOH with Ni0.78WO2.72 being the most efficient, even outper...
Ling is married to Gu Liping (谷丽萍), the former director-general of Youth Business China a non-profit program that aims to promote youth entrepreneurship that is headquartered in Beijing. In 2010 she was deputy director of the Ying Public Interest Foundation, a charity sponsored by the Communist Youth League. In that role she reportedly solicited donations for the foundation.[13] Gu was thought to be placed in custody prior to the initiation of the investigation on Ling Jihua.
When England became an empire, English began borrowing less and became the prolific word lender it is today, Haspelmath told me. If we start borrowing again—the way Arabic stopped exporting words to the rest of the world once its empire crumbled and started borrowing more from French and English—we’ll know we’ve seen the apex of our cultural influence. Until then, at least we’ll be able to find a hot yoga class just about anywhere in the world.

Linguistic loans can appear in a number of forms: Some float on the surface of a language, while others are more integrated. Because English and Japanese have very different sound systems, for instance, Japan often adapts words in ways that make them nearly unrecognizable to English-speakers. Über-Japanese media franchise Pokémon actually takes its name from English (“pocket monster”). Japan’s “puroresu” is another abbreviated compound, from “professional wrestling”; similarly, the extra syllables required to pronounce English consonants have given rise to “purasuchikku” (“plastic”) and “furai” (“fry”). Then there are loans where a word stays intact but the meaning shifts. A “smoking” is French for a tuxedo, and a “dressman” is a German male model. Chinese people say they want to “high” when they want to have a (non-drug-related) good time.

Sub-10 nm nanoparticles (NPs) of M(II)-substituted magnetite MxFe3-xO4 (MxFe1-xO•Fe2O3) (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Cu) were synthesized and studied as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in 0.1 M KOH solution. Loaded on commercial carbon support, these MxFe3-xO4 NPs showed the M(II)-dependent ORR catalytic activities with MnxFe3-xO4 being th...
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