Jiaozuo (Chinese: 焦作; pinyin: Jiāozuò [tɕjáu.tswô]; postal: Tsiaotso) is a prefecture-level city in northern Henan province, China. Sitting on the northern bank of the Yellow River, it borders the provincial capital of Zhengzhou to the south, Xinxiang to the east, Jiyuan to the west, Luoyang to the southwest, and the province of Shanxi to the north.Jiaozuo is one of the core cities of the Central Plains urban agglomeration and a regional central city in the Jin-Yu border area.link
Born Linghu Jihua, Ling was the third son to Linghu Ye (令狐野), a party official, in Pinglu County, Shanxi Province. He and all four of his siblings received names related to the Communist Party's policies. His own name, Jihua, means "planning". In December 1973, as with many other young Chinese, he was sent to work in the countryside as part of the Down to the Countryside Movement. Ling worked in a printing factory.[4] "Linghu" is a very rare surname, eventually most members of the Ling family shortened the "Linghu" to "Ling".
Most languages fall somewhere in between the extremes. Many European countries went through a period of linguistic nationalism in the 19th century and continue to regulate loans today. The Language Council of Norway, for example, has created official “Norwegian” spellings for English loanwords since 1996—although some, like “pøbb” (pub), were apparently rejected by the Norwegian people. Finland, fairly open to loans, has the Kielitoimisto, the Finnish Language Office, which helps create neologisms like “pehmelö” (“smoothie”) and advises on how to adapt foreign words into Finnish. Smaller European languages like Czech, Slovenian, and Croatian (with its “džez,” or jazz, and “hardver”), have traditionally been more resistant than larger ones.
On July 20, 2015, Ling was expelled from the Communist Party of China,[17] and was arrested to face criminal proceedings.[18] Ling's case received significant media attention, since he was the most prominent political figure expelled from the party since criminal proceedings were initiated against former Politburo Standing Committee member Zhou Yongkang. In the party's disciplinary dossier against Ling, he was accused of "violating political discipline, violating political rules, violating organizational discipline, and violating confidentiality discipline." He was further accused of taking in large bribes, aiding in the business interests of his wife, sexual misconduct with "numerous women", and illegally obtaining party and state secrets.[19]
Several weeks prior to the announcement of the investigation, Ling continued to make appearances on state television in his positions of CPPCC Vice Chairman and United Front chief. On December 15 Ling had penned an article on the Communist theory publication Qiushi brimming with praise for the signature political philosophies of Xi Jinping such as the "Chinese Dream". This was seen by observers as a 'last-ditch' declaration of fealty to the new Chinese leader with whom Ling was thought to have lost favour.[11]

CO oxidation is an important reaction both experimentally and industrially, and its performance is usually dominated by the surface charge state. For example, CO oxidation on platinum (Pt) surface requires a proper charge state for the balance of adsorption and activation of CO and O2. Here, we present a “Mott−Schottky modulated catalysis” on Pt na...
Sub-10 nm nanoparticles (NPs) of M(II)-substituted magnetite MxFe3-xO4 (MxFe1-xO•Fe2O3) (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Cu) were synthesized and studied as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in 0.1 M KOH solution. Loaded on commercial carbon support, these MxFe3-xO4 NPs showed the M(II)-dependent ORR catalytic activities with MnxFe3-xO4 being th...

It’s a common experience for English speakers abroad: suddenly recognizing a familiar word in a newspaper, or on a billboard, or in a fragment of conversation. Since World War II, English has become by far the leading exporter of “loanwords,” as they’re known, including nearly universal terms like “OK,” “Internet,” and “hamburger.” The extent to which a language loans words is a measure of its prestige, said Martin Haspelmath, a linguist at the Max Planck Institute. English, clearly, is now on top.
In June 1975, Ling was admitted into the Communist Youth League (CYL) organization in Pinglu County, and was soon elevated to deputy secretary of the local CYL committee. He joined the Communist Party of China in June 1976. In December 1978, Ling was transferred to Communist Party's Yuncheng Committee in Shanxi. In 1979, Communist Youth League's central organization selected young cadres nationwide to work in the capital. Ling, at the age of 23, was recruited to work in the propaganda department of CYL Central Committee.[4]
Chinese is an imperial language that has always loaned more than it borrowed. In the Max Planck Institute’s World Loanword Database, Mandarin Chinese has the lowest percentage of borrowings of all 41 languages studied, only 2 percent. (English, with one of the highest, has 42 percent.) In part because of the difficulty of translating alphabet-based languages into Chinese characters, it’s common to see what are called “calques”—nonphonetic literal translations like “re gou” for “hot dog” or “zhi zhu ren” for “Spiderman.” Despite (or because of) the vast appetite among the Chinese for learning English as a foreign language, Chinese ministers have recently cracked down on loanwords. And yet Chinese people still say “baibai” and “sorry”; “e-mail” is just a lot easier than “dianzi youjian,” the official substitute.
Though it has banned the suona from funerals, the local government has also paradoxically launched several initiatives to preserve the suona tradition. Since 2014, it has funded research and documentation of suona music, as well as an intangible cultural heritage protection plan that pairs around 15 masters with students. It also offers suona musicians performance opportunities. But according to Liu, the gigs are too few and too poorly compensated — some only pay 800 to 1,000 yuan ($120 to $150) for an eight-person band. He doesn’t believe that a state-sponsored imitation of the master-apprentice method will be able to sustain the tradition.

Sub-10 nm nanoparticles (NPs) of M(II)-substituted magnetite MxFe3-xO4 (MxFe1-xO•Fe2O3) (M = Mn, Fe, Co, Cu) were synthesized and studied as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in 0.1 M KOH solution. Loaded on commercial carbon support, these MxFe3-xO4 NPs showed the M(II)-dependent ORR catalytic activities with MnxFe3-xO4 being th...
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