Sometimes purism peaks after a war or in a post-colonial situation. South Korea tried to de-Japanify its language after World War II; the Indian and Pakistani governments tried to separate Hindi and Urdu after their partition. A purist approach can also be a smaller language’s way of resisting outside influence. In Iceland, the Icelandic Language Institute preserves the country’s Viking-era language by cobbling together new terms from indigenous roots. Some Native American groups do the same to resist English.
Ling was one of the highest-profile targets (next to Zhou Yongkang and Xu Caihou) of the anti-corruption campaign following the 18th Party Congress spearheaded by Party General secretary Xi Jinping and central discipline chief Wang Qishan. He was the second sitting "national leader"-level figure to be investigated by the party's anti-graft agency, after CPPCC Vice-Chairman Su Rong. Chinese-language media have linked Ling to a mysterious political network composed of prominent politicians and businesspeople with origins in Shanxi called the Xishan Society.[16]
Categories: 1956 birthsLiving peoplePeople's Republic of China politicians from ShanxiCommunist Party of China politicians from ShanxiPoliticians from YunchengMembers of the Secretariat of the Communist Party of ChinaVice Chairpersons of the National Committee of the Chinese People's Political Consultative ConferenceExpelled members of the Chinese Communist PartyMembers of the 17th Central Committee of the Communist Party of ChinaMembers of the 18th Central Committee of the Communist Party of ChinaAlternate members of the 16th Central Committee of the Communist Party of ChinaChinese politicians convicted of corruption

When England became an empire, English began borrowing less and became the prolific word lender it is today, Haspelmath told me. If we start borrowing again—the way Arabic stopped exporting words to the rest of the world once its empire crumbled and started borrowing more from French and English—we’ll know we’ve seen the apex of our cultural influence. Until then, at least we’ll be able to find a hot yoga class just about anywhere in the world.
Highly active, low-cost, and durable electrocatalysts for the water oxidation reaction are pivotal in energy conversion and storage schemes. Here we report the nitride-core, oxide-shell-armor structured FeCoNi oxynitride as an efficient oxygen evolution electrocatalyst with a homogeneously nitride (Fe0.70Co0.56Ni0.92N1.0O0.06) core and oxide (Fe0.4...
^ Nicholas D. Kristof (January 5, 2013). "Looking for a Jump-Start in China" (opinion). The New York Times. Retrieved January 6, 2013. Ling feared a scandal and reportedly began a cover-up. He went to the morgue, according to the account I got from one Chinese official, and looked at the body — and then coldly denied that it was his son. He continued to work in the following weeks as if nothing had happened.
To further enhance catalytic activity and durability of nanocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), we synthesized a new class of 20 nm × 2 nm ternary alloy FePtM (M = Cu, Ni) nanorods (NRs) with controlled compositions. Supported on carbon support and treated with acetic acid as well as electrochemical etching, these FePtM NRs were converte...
NixWO2.72 nanorods (NRs) are synthesized by a one-pot reaction of Ni(acac)2 and WCl4. In the rod structure, Ni(II) intercalates in the defective perovskite-type WO2.72 and is stabilized. The NixWO2.72 NRs show the x-dependent electrocatalysis for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in 0.1M KOH with Ni0.78WO2.72 being the most efficient, even outper...
We report the synthesis of core/shell face-centered tetragonal (fct)-FePd/Pd nanoparticles (NPs) via reductive annealing of core/shell Pd/Fe3O4 NPs followed by temperature-controlled Fe etching in acetic acid. Among three different kinds of core/shell FePd/Pd NPs studied (FePd core at ~8 nm and Pd shell at 0.27, 0.65 or 0.8 nm), the fct-FePd/Pd-0.6...
It’s not hard to see why governments would seek to defend their languages. But some linguists think a staunch anti-English stance may be counterproductive. Truly endangered languages tend to be encroached on mostly by their dominant geographic neighbors, says Selma Sonntag, a political scientist at Humboldt State University who studies language purist movements: “The threat isn’t from English, it’s from whatever the official language is within their area.” Linguist David Crystal, author of “English as a Global Language,” has written about how Welsh-language purism may be furthering an elitism that prevents younger speakers from adopting the tongue. And it’s worth noting that English owes much of its vitality to its long history of borrowing from French, Latin, Arabic, and pretty much any other language it met. “Loanwords...do alter [a language’s] character—but is this a bad thing?” Crystal told me. “Imagine English without French or Latin loanwords. No Shakespeare, for a start.”
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