Li Bingxiang, a suona fan and former Party secretary of a village in Pingyi County, also believes the instrument has fallen victim to the wide net cast to prevent ostentatious funerals. “The main extravagant expenses are the banquet, coffin, and labor costs for a three-day ceremony,” Li says. “There should be a compromise that reaches the government’s goals but also preserves traditions.”

Several weeks prior to the announcement of the investigation, Ling continued to make appearances on state television in his positions of CPPCC Vice Chairman and United Front chief. On December 15 Ling had penned an article on the Communist theory publication Qiushi brimming with praise for the signature political philosophies of Xi Jinping such as the "Chinese Dream". This was seen by observers as a 'last-ditch' declaration of fealty to the new Chinese leader with whom Ling was thought to have lost favour.[11]
High-quality graphene flakes have long been desirable for numerous applications including energy storage, printable electronics, and catalysis. In this contribution, we report a green, efficient, facile gas-driven exfoliation process for the preparation of high-quality graphene in large scale. The gas exfoliation process was realized by the interpl...
It’s not hard to see why governments would seek to defend their languages. But some linguists think a staunch anti-English stance may be counterproductive. Truly endangered languages tend to be encroached on mostly by their dominant geographic neighbors, says Selma Sonntag, a political scientist at Humboldt State University who studies language purist movements: “The threat isn’t from English, it’s from whatever the official language is within their area.” Linguist David Crystal, author of “English as a Global Language,” has written about how Welsh-language purism may be furthering an elitism that prevents younger speakers from adopting the tongue. And it’s worth noting that English owes much of its vitality to its long history of borrowing from French, Latin, Arabic, and pretty much any other language it met. “Loanwords...do alter [a language’s] character—but is this a bad thing?” Crystal told me. “Imagine English without French or Latin loanwords. No Shakespeare, for a start.”
THERE’S NOTHING LIKE visiting Finland to make an English-speaker appreciate the value of words borrowed from other languages. Finnish, as I learned during a trip earlier this month, is an agglutinative language, in which parts of words stay distinct instead of fusing together. This makes for very long words, like “kahdenneksikymmenenneksiyhdeksänneksi” (one way to say “29,” according to my guidebook), and considerable bewilderment for a visitor. To me, it might as well have been Klingon, only with more umlauts. Every now and then, though, a light would shine through the darkness: I’d catch something like “hot jooga” or “muffensi” or “grill maisteri,” and sigh with relief.
The importance of porous carbon as the support material is well recognized in the catalysis community, and it would be even more attractive if several characteristics are considered, such as the stability in acidic and basic media or the ease of noble metal recovery through complete burn off. Because it is still difficult to obtain constant propert...
Monodisperse cobalt (Co) nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized and stabilized against oxidation via reductive annealing at 600C. The stable Co NPs are active for catalyzing the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in 0.1 M KOH, producing a current density of 10 mA/cm2 at an overpotential of 0.39 V (1.62 V vs. RHE, no iR-correction). Their catalysis is s...
Using FePtAu nanoparticles (NPs) as an example, this Communication demonstrates a new structure-control strategy to tune and optimize NP catalysis. The presence of Au in FePtAu facilitates FePt structure transformation from chemically disordered face-centered cubic (fcc) structure to chemically ordered face-centered tetragonal (fct) structure, and...
The recent reforms are not the first time the suona has been subject to the twists and turns of public policy. In the early days after the Communist victory in 1949, Wang’s family band played the suona not only at weddings and funerals but also at state ceremonies for sending recruits off to military service or starting construction on reservoir projects. Suona music was the soundtrack to every important moment. But during the Great Chinese Famine, no one could afford to hire musicians, and the suona was later blacklisted as part of Cultural Revolution campaigns against Confucian heritage. It wasn’t until the reform and opening-up era in the ’80s that the suona was restored to its central role in northeastern culture.
Interface translation: Tomislav Kuzmić (Croatian), Vasudevan Tirumurti, Fahim Razick (Tamil), Matti Tapanainen (Finnish), Ebru Bağlan (Turkish), Arsene Ionuț, Cristina Crisan (Romanian), Daiva Macijauskė (Lithuanian), Tetiana M. (Ukrainian), András Tuna (Hungarian), Jakob Lautrup Nysom (Danish), Andre Abdullin, Elena Zvaritch (Russian), Catherine Györvàry (French), Gab M., Klaus Röthig (Portuguese), Marcin Orzełek (Polish), Stefanija Madzoska, Daniel Matrakoski (Macedonian), Selina Lüdecke, P. H. Claus (German), Vangelis Katsoulas (Greek), Roberto Marchesi (Italian), Robin van der Vliet (Esperanto), Reno Rake (Indonesian), Nahuel Rodríguez (Spanish), Gao Pan (Chinese), Hoài Sang Lăng (Vietnamese)
Ling was one of the highest-profile targets (next to Zhou Yongkang and Xu Caihou) of the anti-corruption campaign following the 18th Party Congress spearheaded by Party General secretary Xi Jinping and central discipline chief Wang Qishan. He was the second sitting "national leader"-level figure to be investigated by the party's anti-graft agency, after CPPCC Vice-Chairman Su Rong. Chinese-language media have linked Ling to a mysterious political network composed of prominent politicians and businesspeople with origins in Shanxi called the Xishan Society.[16]
Finally, at 15, Wang’s grandfather allowed him to start his suona training. In addition to practicing on the instrument, every day, he was to blow through a hollow reed into a basin of water to improve his breathing technique. At first, he couldn’t even make bubbles. After a year of practicing for hours each day, his grandfather gave him his first performance opportunity — but stage fright got the best of him.
Finally, at 15, Wang’s grandfather allowed him to start his suona training. In addition to practicing on the instrument, every day, he was to blow through a hollow reed into a basin of water to improve his breathing technique. At first, he couldn’t even make bubbles. After a year of practicing for hours each day, his grandfather gave him his first performance opportunity — but stage fright got the best of him.

The recent reforms are not the first time the suona has been subject to the twists and turns of public policy. In the early days after the Communist victory in 1949, Wang’s family band played the suona not only at weddings and funerals but also at state ceremonies for sending recruits off to military service or starting construction on reservoir projects. Suona music was the soundtrack to every important moment. But during the Great Chinese Famine, no one could afford to hire musicians, and the suona was later blacklisted as part of Cultural Revolution campaigns against Confucian heritage. It wasn’t until the reform and opening-up era in the ’80s that the suona was restored to its central role in northeastern culture.
Ling began his career as a functionary in regional branches of the Communist Youth League in his native Shanxi Province. His Youth League involvement propelled him to the national-level organization in 1979. At the Youth League Ling worked in its propaganda department and edited its flagship newspaper. Closely following the footsteps of his patron Hu Jintao, Ling was promoted to a leadership position in the General Office of the Communist Party of China in 1999, and became an important member of the State Commission for Public Sector Reform.
News of the crash was reported in mainland Chinese media shortly after it happened, but the story was then rapidly suppressed.[8] Reportedly, Ling Jihua, after viewing the body of the driver at the morgue, denied it was his son.[9] Ling was also said to have mobilized staff from the Central Security Bureau, an organ in charge of national leaders' security which reported into the General Office, to cover up the crash.[10] Chinese media also reported that Ling had contacted Zhou Yongkang, then chief of the powerful Central Political and Legal Affairs Commission, to reach unspecified "political deals" in exchange for assistance on covering up the death of his son.[11] Ling then went on to work as normal.[12] In China, Internet search terms such as "Ferrari", "Little Ling" and "Prince Ling" were blocked.[6] In November 2012, an 'exclusive' from the South China Morning Post reported that Jiang Jiemin, a former associate of Zhou Yongkang then serving as chief executive of China National Petroleum Corporation, wired money from the company's accounts to the families of the two women involved in the crash to keep silent about the crash.[5]
The importance of porous carbon as the support material is well recognized in the catalysis community, and it would be even more attractive if several characteristics are considered, such as the stability in acidic and basic media or the ease of noble metal recovery through complete burn off. Because it is still difficult to obtain constant propert...
Silicon (Si) has been regarded as next-generation anode for high-energy lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) due to its high Li storage capacity (4200 mA h g−1). However, the mechanical degradation and resultant capacity fade critically hinder its practical application. In this regard, we demonstrate that nanocoating of Si spheres with a 3 nm titanium diox...
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