Taming interfacial electronic effects on Pt nanoparticles modulated by their concomitants has emerged as an intriguing approach to optimize Pt catalytic performance. Here, we report Pt nanoparticles assembled on vacancy-abundant hexagonal boron nitride nanosheets and their use as a model catalyst to embrace an interfacial electronic effect on Pt in...

The importance of porous carbon as the support material is well recognized in the catalysis community, and it would be even more attractive if several characteristics are considered, such as the stability in acidic and basic media or the ease of noble metal recovery through complete burn off. Because it is still difficult to obtain constant propert...

Chinese is an imperial language that has always loaned more than it borrowed. In the Max Planck Institute’s World Loanword Database, Mandarin Chinese has the lowest percentage of borrowings of all 41 languages studied, only 2 percent. (English, with one of the highest, has 42 percent.) In part because of the difficulty of translating alphabet-based languages into Chinese characters, it’s common to see what are called “calques”—nonphonetic literal translations like “re gou” for “hot dog” or “zhi zhu ren” for “Spiderman.” Despite (or because of) the vast appetite among the Chinese for learning English as a foreign language, Chinese ministers have recently cracked down on loanwords. And yet Chinese people still say “baibai” and “sorry”; “e-mail” is just a lot easier than “dianzi youjian,” the official substitute.


A simple, solvent-free, solid-state self-assembly strategy for the synthesis of alkaline-metal-oxide-doped mesoporous carbons (MCs) with tunable mesopores (~5-9 nm), high surface-areas (up to 571 m2/g) and large pore volumes (up to 0.65 cm3/g) is developed via the mechanochemical assembly between polyphenol-Ca2+/Mg2+ composites and F127 copolymers....
In this communication, we report a facile approach to constructing catalytic active hierarchical interfaces in 1-dimensional (1D) nanostructure, exemplified by the synthesis of TiO2-supported PtFe-FeOx nanowires (NWs). The hierarchical interface, constituting of atomic level interactions between PtFe and FeOx within each NW and the interactions bet...
     Jihui Yang is currently the Kyocera Associate Professor at Materials Science and Engineering Department of the University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.  Prior to joining the University of Washington in the Fall of 2011, he was a Technical Fellow and Lab Group Manager at GM Research and Development Center, responsible for leading GM’s research on Li-ion battery materials and systems; as well as advanced thermoelectric materials and technology development.  
Lanthanum-transition-metal perovskites with robust meso-scale porous frameworks (meso-LaMO 3) are synthesized through use of ionic liquids. The resultant samples demonstrate a rather high activity for CO oxidation, by taking advantage of unique nanostructure-derived benefits. This synthesis strategy opens up a new opportunity for preparing functional mesoporous complex oxides of various compositions.

Ling Jihua (Chinese: 令计划; born 22 October 1956) is a former Chinese politician as one of the principal political advisers of former leader Hu Jintao.[1] Ling was best known for his tenure as chief of the General Office of the Communist Party of China between 2007 and 2012. Ling was charged with corruption and sentenced to life imprisonment as part of a larger campaign carried out by Xi Jinping.


On May 13, 2016, the No. 1 branch of Tianjin Municipal People's Procuratorate filed suit against Ling on behalf of the state at the No. 1 Intermediate People's Court of Tianjin.[20] On July 4, 2016, after a closed-door trial, Ling was sentenced to life imprisonment. He was convicted on charges of taking bribes, illegally obtaining state secrets and abuse of power. Upon hearing his sentence, Ling read aloud from a prepared script stating that he did not contest the conviction and "thanked" the court and the lawyers for their work, and used a Chinese idiom (kegu mingxi) to describe how unforgettable the trial had been to him.
It’s not hard to see why governments would seek to defend their languages. But some linguists think a staunch anti-English stance may be counterproductive. Truly endangered languages tend to be encroached on mostly by their dominant geographic neighbors, says Selma Sonntag, a political scientist at Humboldt State University who studies language purist movements: “The threat isn’t from English, it’s from whatever the official language is within their area.” Linguist David Crystal, author of “English as a Global Language,” has written about how Welsh-language purism may be furthering an elitism that prevents younger speakers from adopting the tongue. And it’s worth noting that English owes much of its vitality to its long history of borrowing from French, Latin, Arabic, and pretty much any other language it met. “Loanwords...do alter [a language’s] character—but is this a bad thing?” Crystal told me. “Imagine English without French or Latin loanwords. No Shakespeare, for a start.”
×