On May 13, 2016, the No. 1 branch of Tianjin Municipal People's Procuratorate filed suit against Ling on behalf of the state at the No. 1 Intermediate People's Court of Tianjin.[20] On July 4, 2016, after a closed-door trial, Ling was sentenced to life imprisonment. He was convicted on charges of taking bribes, illegally obtaining state secrets and abuse of power. Upon hearing his sentence, Ling read aloud from a prepared script stating that he did not contest the conviction and "thanked" the court and the lawyers for their work, and used a Chinese idiom (kegu mingxi) to describe how unforgettable the trial had been to him.
NixWO2.72 nanorods (NRs) are synthesized by a one-pot reaction of Ni(acac)2 and WCl4. In the rod structure, Ni(II) intercalates in the defective perovskite-type WO2.72 and is stabilized. The NixWO2.72 NRs show the x-dependent electrocatalysis for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) in 0.1M KOH with Ni0.78WO2.72 being the most efficient, even outper...
Li Bingxiang, a suona fan and former Party secretary of a village in Pingyi County, also believes the instrument has fallen victim to the wide net cast to prevent ostentatious funerals. “The main extravagant expenses are the banquet, coffin, and labor costs for a three-day ceremony,” Li says. “There should be a compromise that reaches the government’s goals but also preserves traditions.”
To performers, the suona has unfairly taken the blame for other, more vulgar, funeral practices. Wang believes the reforms have only crushed suona music and firecrackers because noise easily draws officials’ attention. Earlier this year, the Pingyi County government announced it would confiscate musical instruments played at funerals. When Wang and other suona masters performed at the funeral of an esteemed elder in June, village officials barged in and caused a commotion. The suona was small enough to be quickly hidden, but bigger instruments were snatched away.
Ling was one of the highest-profile targets (next to Zhou Yongkang and Xu Caihou) of the anti-corruption campaign following the 18th Party Congress spearheaded by Party General secretary Xi Jinping and central discipline chief Wang Qishan. He was the second sitting "national leader"-level figure to be investigated by the party's anti-graft agency, after CPPCC Vice-Chairman Su Rong. Chinese-language media have linked Ling to a mysterious political network composed of prominent politicians and businesspeople with origins in Shanxi called the Xishan Society.[16]
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