In this communication, we report a facile approach to constructing catalytic active hierarchical interfaces in 1-dimensional (1D) nanostructure, exemplified by the synthesis of TiO2-supported PtFe-FeOx nanowires (NWs). The hierarchical interface, constituting of atomic level interactions between PtFe and FeOx within each NW and the interactions bet...
The most successful band in Pingyi County is headed by 29-year-old Liu Ji. In jeans and a tight white T-shirt, with a gleaming stud in his ear, Liu looks the perfect antithesis of Wang, the traditionalist in gray trousers and a loose white shirt. Yet Liu, too, learned to play the suona with a reed and a water basin, he says, practicing through hot summer days until the sweat from his feet soaked prints into the ground. He, too, inherited his band from his family, but he added young acrobats, dancers, singers, and Western instruments.
Born Linghu Jihua, Ling was the third son to Linghu Ye (令狐野), a party official, in Pinglu County, Shanxi Province. He and all four of his siblings received names related to the Communist Party's policies. His own name, Jihua, means "planning". In December 1973, as with many other young Chinese, he was sent to work in the countryside as part of the Down to the Countryside Movement. Ling worked in a printing factory.[4] "Linghu" is a very rare surname, eventually most members of the Ling family shortened the "Linghu" to "Ling".
To performers, the suona has unfairly taken the blame for other, more vulgar, funeral practices. Wang believes the reforms have only crushed suona music and firecrackers because noise easily draws officials’ attention. Earlier this year, the Pingyi County government announced it would confiscate musical instruments played at funerals. When Wang and other suona masters performed at the funeral of an esteemed elder in June, village officials barged in and caused a commotion. The suona was small enough to be quickly hidden, but bigger instruments were snatched away.
Categories: 1956 birthsLiving peoplePeople's Republic of China politicians from ShanxiCommunist Party of China politicians from ShanxiPoliticians from YunchengMembers of the Secretariat of the Communist Party of ChinaVice Chairpersons of the National Committee of the Chinese People's Political Consultative ConferenceExpelled members of the Chinese Communist PartyMembers of the 17th Central Committee of the Communist Party of ChinaMembers of the 18th Central Committee of the Communist Party of ChinaAlternate members of the 16th Central Committee of the Communist Party of ChinaChinese politicians convicted of corruption
Li Bingxiang, a suona fan and former Party secretary of a village in Pingyi County, also believes the instrument has fallen victim to the wide net cast to prevent ostentatious funerals. “The main extravagant expenses are the banquet, coffin, and labor costs for a three-day ceremony,” Li says. “There should be a compromise that reaches the government’s goals but also preserves traditions.”
To performers, the suona has unfairly taken the blame for other, more vulgar, funeral practices. Wang believes the reforms have only crushed suona music and firecrackers because noise easily draws officials’ attention. Earlier this year, the Pingyi County government announced it would confiscate musical instruments played at funerals. When Wang and other suona masters performed at the funeral of an esteemed elder in June, village officials barged in and caused a commotion. The suona was small enough to be quickly hidden, but bigger instruments were snatched away.
Tailoring the atomic structural configuration at metal and oxide interface offers an effective route for the development of catalysts with optimized properties. Here, we report the design of a unique structural configuration of yolk-shell-like FePt-FeOx nanoparticles (NPs), that exhibits notably enhanced activity and stability towards CO oxidation...
It’s not hard to see why governments would seek to defend their languages. But some linguists think a staunch anti-English stance may be counterproductive. Truly endangered languages tend to be encroached on mostly by their dominant geographic neighbors, says Selma Sonntag, a political scientist at Humboldt State University who studies language purist movements: “The threat isn’t from English, it’s from whatever the official language is within their area.” Linguist David Crystal, author of “English as a Global Language,” has written about how Welsh-language purism may be furthering an elitism that prevents younger speakers from adopting the tongue. And it’s worth noting that English owes much of its vitality to its long history of borrowing from French, Latin, Arabic, and pretty much any other language it met. “Loanwords...do alter [a language’s] character—but is this a bad thing?” Crystal told me. “Imagine English without French or Latin loanwords. No Shakespeare, for a start.”
Chinese is an imperial language that has always loaned more than it borrowed. In the Max Planck Institute’s World Loanword Database, Mandarin Chinese has the lowest percentage of borrowings of all 41 languages studied, only 2 percent. (English, with one of the highest, has 42 percent.) In part because of the difficulty of translating alphabet-based languages into Chinese characters, it’s common to see what are called “calques”—nonphonetic literal translations like “re gou” for “hot dog” or “zhi zhu ren” for “Spiderman.” Despite (or because of) the vast appetite among the Chinese for learning English as a foreign language, Chinese ministers have recently cracked down on loanwords. And yet Chinese people still say “baibai” and “sorry”; “e-mail” is just a lot easier than “dianzi youjian,” the official substitute.

Ling was one of the highest-profile targets (next to Zhou Yongkang and Xu Caihou) of the anti-corruption campaign following the 18th Party Congress spearheaded by Party General secretary Xi Jinping and central discipline chief Wang Qishan. He was the second sitting "national leader"-level figure to be investigated by the party's anti-graft agency, after CPPCC Vice-Chairman Su Rong. Chinese-language media have linked Ling to a mysterious political network composed of prominent politicians and businesspeople with origins in Shanxi called the Xishan Society.[16]
Ling was one of the highest-profile targets (next to Zhou Yongkang and Xu Caihou) of the anti-corruption campaign following the 18th Party Congress spearheaded by Party General secretary Xi Jinping and central discipline chief Wang Qishan. He was the second sitting "national leader"-level figure to be investigated by the party's anti-graft agency, after CPPCC Vice-Chairman Su Rong. Chinese-language media have linked Ling to a mysterious political network composed of prominent politicians and businesspeople with origins in Shanxi called the Xishan Society.[16]
Ling rose to become the Director of the General Office, an organ that handles day-to-day logistics and bureaucratic functions of the Communist Party, in 2007, when Hu was the party's General Secretary (i.e., paramount leader). He was initially seen as a promising candidate for promotion to the top leadership at the 18th Party Congress in 2012. However, his political fortunes abruptly took a turn when his 23-year-old son was killed while driving a Ferrari in 2012, an event that caused embarrassment for the party elite. Ling was then politically sidelined.
We report the synthesis of core/shell face-centered tetragonal (fct)-FePd/Pd nanoparticles (NPs) via reductive annealing of core/shell Pd/Fe3O4 NPs followed by temperature-controlled Fe etching in acetic acid. Among three different kinds of core/shell FePd/Pd NPs studied (FePd core at ~8 nm and Pd shell at 0.27, 0.65 or 0.8 nm), the fct-FePd/Pd-0.6...

High-quality graphene flakes have long been desirable for numerous applications including energy storage, printable electronics, and catalysis. In this contribution, we report a green, efficient, facile gas-driven exfoliation process for the preparation of high-quality graphene in large scale. The gas exfoliation process was realized by the interpl...

The suona is a traditional Chinese wind instrument similar to the oboe that is customarily played alongside gongs, drums, and the sheng mouth organ at weddings and funerals in rural northeastern China. In Shandong province, where the suona is sometimes known by the onomatopoeic name “wulawa,” the instrument is an integral part of traditional culture. But in Shandong’s Pingyi County, where Wang hails from, suona performances have been banned from funerals since October 2016 as part of local government reforms aiming to curb lavish, showy ceremonies.


Several weeks prior to the announcement of the investigation, Ling continued to make appearances on state television in his positions of CPPCC Vice Chairman and United Front chief. On December 15 Ling had penned an article on the Communist theory publication Qiushi brimming with praise for the signature political philosophies of Xi Jinping such as the "Chinese Dream". This was seen by observers as a 'last-ditch' declaration of fealty to the new Chinese leader with whom Ling was thought to have lost favour.[11]
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